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The Internet Shift from Television.

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Americans with Internet access are watching less television, according to the UCLA Internet Report 2001. The survey of 2,000 households also shows that, as users get more on-line experience, their television viewing declines further.
Most Internet users report that they spend about the same amount of time on non-computing activities at home as they did before they had the Internet. Internet users watch 4.5 hours less television weekly than do non-Internet users, however. And among users who have had Internet access for five or more years, almost 35 percent said their television viewing decreased, compared to about 30 percent among users who have been on-line for less than a year.
Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the UCLA Internet Project polls non-users and users alike. The objective is to survey populations in the U.S. and abroad for an entire generation, and to get a comprehensive picture of how the Internet is affecting society.

In a sign that the Internet is gaining popularity among young people, parents increasingly deny access to it as a punishment. In the 2001 survey, the percentage of parents who said they did so increased from 30.6 percent to 37.2 percent, while those using denial of television as a punishment decreased slightly from 48.7 percent to 47.5 percent.
“We are undertaking the study of the Internet that should have been conducted on television in the late 1940s,” said Jeffrey Cole, director of the UCLA Center for Communication Policy. “Although that opportunity was missed, we can take this chance to explore how the Internet’s emergence is affecting consumer behavior, civic processes, careers and other social factors. We are beginning to look not just at the U.S., but also at Europe and Asia, and next year the sample will include Iran.”

The survey provides a trove of information about how Americans interact with their computers. More than 72 percent of Americans have some form of access to the Internet, up from 67 percent in 2000. Of those not yet on-line, 44.4 percent expect to get connected in the next 12 months. Asked to rate the Internet’s importance as a source of information, more than 90 percent said it is moderately to extremely important.
Strikingly, the percentage stating that the Internet is not an important information source dropped from 17.2 percent last year to only 3 percent in 2001. Trust in the accuracy of Internet information increased in the 2001 survey, as 56.1 percent of respondents said most such information is reliable, compared to 52.2 percent in 2000.

“Everyone recognizes that the Internet has reshaped society,” said Tom Greene, senior program director for the NSF Division of Advanced Networking Infrastructure and Research. “But the UCLA study offers vital details about how our lives are being changed. Our division of NSF tends to focus on cutting-edge networking for the research community, and this report is an important reminder of the broader impacts on daily life. For example, those 18 or younger are significantly drawn to the Internet as a way to meet people, which could have many implications.”
Among 16- to 18-year-olds, 33.7 percent say they find it easier to meet people on-line than in person. For those 15 and younger, the figure is 28 percent. Those percentages far outstrip the number of adults who state such a preference, from 12.5 percent among 19- to 25-year-olds to less than 10 percent among respondents over 26 years old. Young people are also more likely to have multiple screen names and to share intimate details that they wouldn’t generally reveal in person.

Asked whether they tell their parents about everything they do on the Internet, 55 percent said no. About 91 percent of parents say they supervise kids’ Internet use by “keeping an eye” on them, compared to 31.5 percent who use filtering software. Just over 62 percent said they limit the time children spend on-line, and 66.7 percent said their children have to ask permission before using the Internet.
For more about the UCLA Internet Project, including the complete 2001 report, see: http://www.ccp.ucla.edu. source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/11/011130080015.htm


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Groupthink and Organizational Bias.

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Groupthink is a psychological phenomenon that occurs within a group of people, in which the desire for harmony or conformity in the group results in an irrational or dysfunctional decision-making outcome. Group members try to minimize conflict and reach a consensus decision without critical evaluation of alternative viewpoints, by actively suppressing dissenting viewpoints, and by isolating themselves from outside influences.

Loyalty to the group requires individuals to avoid raising controversial issues or alternative solutions, and there is loss of individual creativity, uniqueness and independent thinking. The dysfunctional group dynamics of the “ingroup” produces an “illusion of invulnerability” (an inflated certainty that the right decision has been made). Thus the “ingroup” significantly overrates its own abilities in decision-making, and significantly underrates the abilities of its opponents (the “outgroup”). Furthermore groupthink can produce dehumanizing actions against the “outgroup”.

Groupthink is a construct of social psychology but has an extensive reach, and influences literature in the fields of communication studies, political science, management, and organizational theory, as well as important aspects of deviant religious cult behavior.


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Will Automation Free Us From Labor?

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More than 50 percent of current occupations won’t exist in 10 years. Jobs of redundant processing will be replaced with automated processes completed by computers and machines. This revolution of automation should free us from our labor, lead to a higher standard of living, and allow us more time to enjoy our freedom. This will lead to a more intelligent society as people have more time to learn and pursue their passions. The simple solution will be how to enable people to have access to resources they need to have a successful life such as food, water, shelter, electricity, and access to information without the need for work in the traditional sense.


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Online Marketing Success – Provide Value With Educational Content

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Marketing is shifting with increasingly velocity towards content relevance, while leaving behind tradition channel methods of the past. The focus shift from traditional gimmicks towards consumer education creates a stronger connection in the foundation of the consumer relationship. Consumer trust is gained though providing education, while gathering intelligent data on what consumers want. In the information age, everyone wants information. The shorter, and more concise answers to what users seek, the better. Google is thriving on this principle. The old norms of trying to convince people what they should want, are no longer as effective as listening to what they want. Images and brands are being more valued on the value they provide to consumers. In other words, brand loyalty resides within the value provided to consumers, not the fancy trademark stamped on a product. Innovation and good value are the king, and good content is the delivery method.  Success will come by providing innovation, good value, and delivering the message with good content through a variety of channels, such as: social media, press releases. articles, blogs. newsletters, white papers, case studies, and videos. Customer service, quality control, and efficiency are also key factors in success.


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Google and The Evolution from Virtualization to Containerization

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In 2005, Google was struggling with the problems of delivering a web-based services at scale; specifically how to scale consumption of resources in their data center elastically to give all users of the service a great experience however many (or few) of them were using the service at any given instant, while simultaneously using any leftover resources for background jobs.

Google experimented with virtualization for this task but quickly found it unsuitable; the main problems being that the performance penalty for virtualizing was too high (equivalent to the density being too low) and the response wasn’t elastic enough to support a web-based service at scale. This latter point is interesting because web services cannot predict at any given time whether they’ll be servicing 10, 100 or one million requests.

However, the users sitting on the other end expect instant response regardless of how many others are simultaneously using the service. With the average spin-up time of a hypervisor being measured in tens of seconds, it’s clear that the user expectations of results within a second simply cannot be met. At the same time, a group of engineers were experimenting in Linux with a concept based on cgroups called process containers. Within a matter of months, Google hired this group and set about containerizing its data centers to solve the elasticity at scale problem.

In January 2008, some of the cgroup technology used by Google made its way into the Linux Kernel and the LXC (LinuX Containers) project was born. At around this same time, SWSoft became Parallels, and Virtuozzo was released into Open Source as the OpenVZ project. In 2011, Google and Parallels agreed to collaborate on their respective container technologies, resulting in the 2013 release of Linux Kernel 3.8, in which all the Linux container technologies (at least as far as the kernel goes) were unified, thus avoiding a repeat of the damaging Xen/KVM split within the kernel.

When looking at your enterprise today, everywhere you see a V for
virtualization could now be replaced in terms of C, as the resulting benefits of containerization emerges.